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News Story
Updated: 06/18/2014 12:13:10AM

Selecting citrus varieties for the home grove

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ARCADIAN PHOTO BY AL SMOKE

Joshua Citrus, 4135 SE C.R. 760, in DeSoto County does not sell citrus trees, but it is an excellent place to sample and purchase fresh citrus fruit.

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ARCADIAN PHOTO BY AL SMOKE

Grapefruit are named for the way the fruits hang in large clusters. Home grown frit may have some blemishes from insects and diseases, but usually it does not affect fruit quality.

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ARCADIAN PHOTO BY AL SMOKE

Navel oranges and other citrus are ready when they yield to slight pressure. In our area navels don’t achieve full color and also don’t usually develop the large ‘navel’ that gives the fruit its name.

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ARCADIAN PHOTO BY AL SMOKE

Pick and squeeze your own citrus for fresh juice. Blend varieties for unique flavor. If you find grapefruit juice too tart, add just a dash of grenadine syrup for a splash of color and sweetness.

By KAREN SMOKE

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When we moved to Florida over 30 years ago, a home citrus grove was number one on our project list.

Dooryard citrus was once more widespread, but problems with diseases turned many people off of growing their own fruit. Is it worthwhile to plant your own citrus? It is if you make use of the fruit. Choose fruits your family will enjoy. Do you want fruit for fresh eating? Choose tangerines, navel oranges and grapefruit. Do you want fruit for juicing? Choose early and late season oranges for an extended harvest.

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